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My new Razer/Microsoft mouse is a large rodent

Miscellaneous Forums/General Discussion/My new Razer/Microsoft mouse is a large rodent

puki(Posted 1+ years ago) #1
EDIT (24/11):
I have managed to convince Razer of the problems and they will take this up internally.


My spanking new Microsoft Habu Lazer gaming mouse (based on the Razer mice) is an ugly duckling that nobody loves.

Razer's customer support don't want anything to do with it - neither do Microsoft. Based on the fact that Razer refferred me to Microsoft and Microsoft haven't got it listed as a recognised product you can actually moan about.


The Saga:

When I read the instructions (with pictures) it said plug in the mouse, then install the software.

On attempting to follow this - there was a sticky label over the USB plug saying 'Install the software first' - ie do it the opposite way described (with pictures) in the manual.

I sat there for a bit and thought to myself 'One of these supplied instructions is wrong'.

I then noticed a piece of paper that had been inserted in the manual telling me it was very important to install the latest Habu software and firmware at step 2 in the manual.

So, this piece of paper is now supporting the manual. Insert the mouse first then on step 2 (install the software), instead of installing the software from the CD, you actually install the software from Razer's website as per the little paper insert.

So, it is 2 vs 1 to inserting the mouse and then installing the software.

I download the update from Razer's site and find it is a folder with 2 sub folders (one called 'Firmware', the other called 'Software') but no accompanying 'readme file'. I sit there again think 'Mmm, what do I do here? - do I install the Firmware or the Software first?' Both folders have their own exe. files.

Now, there is a problem here - updating firmware wrongly can damage a product. This is even mentioned on Razer's site (for a similar product): http://www.razersupport.com/index.php?_m=knowledgebase&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=3&nav=0

I contacted Razer's support centre and pointed out that their software download has no instructions for use. I pointed out that a user could be confused as to whether to install the software first or the firmware first.

Razer's response was:

Hi,

Please refer to Microsoft for assistance for the Microsoft Habu mouse. You may want to refer to their solution centre

via http://support.microsoft.com/ph/12104

You can also find their contact numbers in this page - http://support.microsoft.com/oas/default.aspx?gprid=12104 They

will be able to provide the necessary advice to you.


However, I just want a simple answer here - I am installing a mouse not a fully functional badger's brain to a USB port.

What's the big secret in installing this chuffing mouse?

I pointed out to Razer (having taken a look myself) that more of their downloads (for various products) do not have readme files and that Razer seem to expect users to read through knowledgebase entries (without being prompted to do so) prior to trying to install a product that could become damaged if not installed correctly.

So, Razer have passed the buck to Microsoft.

I took a look at the Microsoft links, but Microsoft were spouting on about using their standard Intellipoint drivers. So to cut to the chase (considering I paid a lot for a Lazer gaming mouse), I thought I'd just ask Microsoft directly via their support email. However, the product is not on Microsofts support list:

http://support.microsoft.com/select/default.aspx?target=assistance&ln=en-gb&c1=502&

There is a list of mice there - but the Microsoft Habu is not one of them.

So, I have a mouse that nobody knows how to properly install.




SculptureOfSoul(Posted 1+ years ago) #2
The price of form over function?

But seriously, that's a crock of boiling feces. I'd personally send it right back and then avoid Razer products in the future. I can't stand companies that don't back their products (and let's not get started w/ MS.)

Hopefully that'll be the only hang-up w/ your new build.


puki(Posted 1+ years ago) #3
Someone at Razer decided to set up a blog about this mouse - he spouts on about getting 1,223 email from gamers around the world enquiring about it.

http://blog.razerzone.com/2006/08/25/habu-vs-copperhead/

However, it seems blatant that it has become a haven for people complaining about installing the mouse.

What a bunch of losers (ie Razer).

They simply haven't got a clue - not a single clue about mice.

I have already told them more than once - just put readme files in your downloads. I used the words 'You must take ownership of these problems'.

They still refferred me to Microsoft though.

What a bunch of losers.


SculptureOfSoul(Posted 1+ years ago) #4
Here's a (hopefully) helpful post from near the bottom of that page

Read all the way through first. This is incredibly stupid for a mouse install, but you MUST get all of it working. This takes about 12 reboots.
Do NOT install the provided CDROM software. Do NOT plug your mouse in.
Use your current mouse to download the updates from Razer.
Get the updates all set up (extracted to a folder, etc.)
Uninstall your current mouse from hardware devices.
Reboot.
Install Razer software. During installation, you should be required to accept non-M$ drivers. If you’re lucky, you won’t blue-screen.
Reboot.
Choose a USB port that you want the Razer mouse to always be plugged into; according to Razer docs, it will lose the driver if you plug it back and forth from other ports. Then, plug in the Razer mouse. It may *say* Habu found, but it probably isn’t. Open the hardware screen, and find your mouse in the list. If the drivers are there, then skip down below to #14. Otherwise, uninstall it.
Scan for changes; it will re-install. It still probably won’t have the right driver.
Choose the “Update Driver”. Don’t allow it to search; select the driver. It will want you to put in the CD; don’t. Instead, go to
C:\Program Files\Razer\Habu\Driver and choose habu.sys.
You will know things are correct when you are forced to allow an unsigned driver to install. If you’re lucky, it won’t blue screen.
Reboot.
Now install the Firmware update found in the extracted folder. It will install a “Freescale” driver which you can just let it search for itself and find. It should complete OK. You will be prompted at the end to unplug and replug your mouse - make sure you use the same USB Port.
Reboot.
Now in the Habu configuration software it should be 2.0 software and 2.0 firmware. If it’s not, then good luck.
Reminder that changing the Polling Rate requires a reboot; DPI switching does not. I have mine set on 1000 (scans once per millisecond).


puki(Posted 1+ years ago) #5
Ah, yes - but I am currently trying to extract an answer from Razer as to whether or not this mouse can be damaged by an incorrect firmware update process. They are still referring me to Microsoft.

I pointed out to them that the mouse, that his mouse is based on ('The Copperhead'), can be damaged if you mess up flashing the Firmware.

Everybody who has bought this mouse appears to be using trial and error to install it - probably as there are no instructions.

Someone has got to take ownership here - simple as that. I want an official answer from someone official.

All these people are possibly risking their warranties.


SculptureOfSoul(Posted 1+ years ago) #6
Agreed. Entirely understandable.

What's the return policy from the vendor you got it from? I'd just unload the thing if you can. I mean, what kind of mouse will lose it's driver if you change the port it's plugged into? Ridiculous.


puki(Posted 1+ years ago) #7
Oh, I am going to keep the mouse - I like the blue lighting on it.

It works as a standard mouse - I've got it plugged in at the moment without any software.

However, I am going to fight for someone to actually take ownership of the installation of it. Without the software, I cannot access any of the juicy stuff. However, I bought it as it was black with blue lighting - at least it is still black and has blue lighting, albeit not installed correctly.


Shambler(Posted 1+ years ago) #8

Do NOT install the provided CDROM software. Do NOT plug your mouse in.
Use your current mouse to download the updates from Razer.


One wonders what you would do if you were building a completely new system and didn't have any other mice ^^


Madk(Posted 1+ years ago) #9
Keyboard shortcuts! :)

I use them now and again, more notably the 'tab' button!

Dabz


Amon(Posted 1+ years ago) #10
My experiance with Razer has been positive. I bought their Razer Diamondback 1600dpi mouse which glows red and it's a gem to use. The Razer eXact Mat(mouspad) has got to be the best thing I've bought after my Saitek Eclipse Keyboard.

I think the reason Puki is having problems with Razer is because Microsoft are invloved.

Viva La Kirsty!


Blitzplotter(Posted 1+ years ago) #11
lol :-> chuffing mouse.


Floyd(Posted 1+ years ago) #12
It's a Microsoft product so it is their responsibily. If they don't support it then take it back. And I would call a Microsoft toll free support line and waste some of their money, just for spite.


Rook Zimbabwe(Posted 1+ years ago) #13
Just what does this mouse do that has you needing to install firmware and drivers??? Aside from being blue? It seems to work as a regular mouse???

I got a logitech wheel mouse with a red led back when they were 39.99 and I considered it an indulgence but I was creating a lot of graphic design then... I used a USB to PS2 adaptor to plug it in to the mouseport. Had no probs with it ever so far (6 years...) does what it is supposed to do....

Is this some sort of gaming mouse? I remember a few of them that proved disappointing yo some of my friends...


Warren(Posted 1+ years ago) #14
The last Razer mouse I tried was that god awful BoomSlang thing from a few years back. Never again.


puki(Posted 1+ years ago) #15
Hi there,

Thank you for highlighting this up to us.
We will be referring this to the Engineering team and the Person in charge about this matter.

Thank you once again.



Me and Razer had a discussion and we decided I was right.


VP(Posted 1+ years ago) #16
My next upgrade (from a Logitech MX1000) will either be to the G7 cordless, or whatever Logitech bring out next to succeed it.

I knew there was a reason I don't buy Microsoft mice (or Razer) and this thread neatly highlights it.


AlexO(Posted 1+ years ago) #17
i have a razer copperhead and it's great for gaming. Now installing it was a different story. I mistakenly installed the wrong drivers (the diamondback drivers), so it royally screwed up the driver support for my razer. It was hell trying to uninstall the thing. They have no proper 'uninstall' package/button. I had to go throughout my registry deleting around 20 keys, a dangerous proposition to any person who may not be computer savvy and is simply just a 'gamer'.

If you install it the correct way, it's flawless. But they do little for fail safes though.


xlsior(Posted 1+ years ago) #18
Ah, yes - but I am currently trying to extract an answer from Razer as to whether or not this mouse can be damaged by an incorrect firmware update process. They are still referring me to Microsoft.


Any product can be paperweighted by a bunked firmware install. A few rare motherboards have a backup ROM with the original firmware that can be restored in case of a critical failure, but in general you are screwed if a firmware update goes wrong.

In short: Never, EVER update a products firmware, unless you know for certain that the update fixes an existing problem that you personally are running into.

(I've killed two devices through a firmware upgrade myself: a Pentium 3 motherboard that passed all checks, yet never booted up again after the install completed, and a Linksys wireless router when I lost my (cabled) connection half-way through the flash process.)

For the most part though, a mouse is a mouse is a mouse. I have a microsoft wheelmouse optical, and also had a wireless microsoft mouse, and never bothered to install any software (including the intellipoint driver CD that came with the mice) yet they work fine.


Damien Sturdy(Posted 1+ years ago) #19

and a Linksys wireless router when I lost my (cabled) connection half-way through the flash process



Most linksys routers have an FTP function that allows you to recover from a brick. That router's probably long gone now though, right?